“Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn’t do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines, sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.” ~ Mark Twain

20 January 2013

Manaoag | Pray, Eat, and Love


Memories of Manaoag, Pangasinan known for its miraculous Our Lady of Manaoag dates back when I was still in grade school. It was some sort of a clan summer outing to pay devotion to the Our Lady then we headed off to the beach after. The second time I was here--actually just passing through was in early 90s when we were having a project visit in Sta. Barbara and we dropped by Manaoag church for some rice cakes. Since then, I have not been to Manaoag.

Manaoag

Manaoag

It was the beginning of the year, and it was auspicious day for the family to pay a visit to the Our Lady of Manaoag. First, it was time for thanksgiving for the past good year. Second, I have not been able to visit the place for the longest time, and, third, it was just the most opportune time to again ask for protection and blessings for the trips of The Pinoy Explorer for 2013!

Manaoag

The church complex has transformed a lot. It is now more organized--parking, vehicular and human traffic, and the vendors around the church.

I remember when I was a kid that the complex was in total chaos. Touts would just pin a cross or a religious medallion on your chest without you asking them--and you are "forced" to buy them. Now they are confined to the fringes of the church yard and are not allowed inside its compound--giving more space and quiet time for pilgrims like us.

Security personnel are adequate enough to make everyone feel safe. Parking is well managed, hough it was not a peak season. I guess, it could get worse during the Holy Week or fiesta, but nonetheless, I found it okay.

Manaoag

Cleanliness is maintained in and around the complex. The comfort rooms are maintained--not so clean because of the human traffic, but not the kind of stinking public comfort rooms. There are designated garbage bins all around and I have even seen security personnel picking up trash that were left by some unmindful souls. Kudos to the church administration for making the pilgrimage not like a marketplace. I wish all pilgrimage sites would be managed like this.

Manaoag

Manaoag

Overall, the family pilgrimage was okay. Starting the year with thanksgiving and prayer was just great, especially when you are bonding with your family. With a bunch of grown-up kids feasting on puto and a sumptuous lunch after the pilgrimage, was just perfect!

More photos of Manaoag HERE.



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6 COMMENTED:

  1. This I missed when we were in Binalonan, Pangasinan last year. It's a lesson learned that I must always take the chance to maximize my travels for God knows when will I be able to have that same opportunity again. Thanks for sharing your story Kuya Ding!

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  2. Sayang nga Roniel. Isang bayan na lang. ilang minuto. But I am sure there will be more opportunities to come!

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  3. What a way to start the year! My relatives visit Manaoag regularly. I've actually never been, and really curious to see how it's like. I'm not religious, but a lot of family members are thankful to the church for being 'healed'. Someday, I'll join them in the pilgrimage. And would love to have some puto too!

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  4. Indeed, Gaye! Yeah, why not join the pilgrimage next time? there's lots of puto and mangos there! hehe

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  5. Sarap ng Puto pre. Pero mas masarap ang bonding at ang story behind the Puto.:-).

    ReplyDelete
  6. totoo yan Bonz...daghang salamat!

    ReplyDelete

The Pinoy Explorer is a Filipino Travel Blog focusing on travel and tourism in the Philippines that highlights Filipino people, some of the best places in the Philippines to visit, communities he has worked with, Philippine festivals and events, and Filipino culture and heritage.

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